Methodist Church Members Serving in WWI

The Oregonian, 7 Jan 1918, page 16

Services in keeping with a memorable event, the unfurling of a service flag bearing 50 stars, were conducted last night at the First Methodist Church by Rev. Joshua Stansfield. Midway they were interrupted by dramatic incident that brought a salvo of applause.

Rev. C. E. Cline, commander of the Loyal Legion, in the opening of his address, referred to a young slave, purchased by a man named Morgan, of the famous Kentucky family, and brought to Oregon in the early days. Several years afterward the slave was told that he was in a free state, and left his master, being befriended by Rev. Mr. Cline and his good wife.

The speaker paid a high tribute to the fineness of the young colored man’s character. Morgan, as the latter was known, remained with the Clines as a servant for a number of years, and finally received his wages in full, together with the gratitude of his employer, when the minister moved away from Albany, where he had been located.

As Rev. Mr. Cline told the story his glance wandered to the gallery of the church. He halted, astonishment was registered on his face, and after a perceptible pause continued his talk. But in conclusion he astounded his hearers by announcing:

“That man is with us tonight. I see him among those in the gallery. Morgan, stand up!”

The congregation turned as the minister’s finger pointed. In the gallery stood the man who came to Oregon as a slave, bearing his years and his citizenship with dignity. And the First Methodist Church resounded to applause.

Dr. Stansfield’s sermon was in keeping with the event of the evening, the unfurling of the great service flag with its 50 stars, one for each of the parish members who wear the uniform of America. A stirring memory tribute to the flag, replete with adventurous narrative, was given by Dr. Cline. “Never Let the Old Flag Fall,” and “Keep the Home Fires Burning” were sung by the male quartet, Messrs. Wetzel, Brown, Williams and Mitchel.

The following names are on the honor roll of the church, and are represented by stars on the service flag, which hangs in a central position, before the altar:

The names of Dr. J. H. Cudlipp and Clarence Likens, who have enlisted but who have not yet been called into service, are now on the honor roll and will soon add stars to the flag, making 52 in all.